Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property book. Happy reading Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Pocket Guide.
Freely available

By reading the early English novel in conjunction with contemporary legal texts on marriage—parliamentary acts and debates, case law, marriage settlements, and private separation deeds—I demonstrate that eighteenth-century English marriage law and practice was constituted through a variety of conflicting legal fictions.


  1. Across the Wall: Narratives of Israeli-Palestinian History (Library of Modern Middle East Studies)!
  2. Part One: Credit, Commerce, and Women's Property Relationships;
  3. Hegemony and Fantasy in Irish Drama, 1899-1949.
  4. In This Article.
  5. Main content;
  6. - Document - Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property?

I further demonstrate that the early novel was preoccupied with how those fictions shaped the lived experience of domesticity, particularly for women. The fictional precepts and presumptions underwriting emerging contract theory and traditional marriage doctrine at once directed and circumscribed proto modern developments in marriage, property, and divorce law.

Moreover, the novel, in its mimetic and ideological capacities, variously worked to expose, advance, and revise those fictions, thereby amplifying and altering their historical force. Examining the dialectical relationship between legal texts and the novels of Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Frances Burney, Charlotte Smith, Elizabeth Inchbald, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Jane Austen, this project challenges traditional conceptions of the law as stable, objective, and truth-bearing, and it demonstrates the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to historical inquiry.

Each chapter explores the legal fictions implicated at a particular stage in the marriage contracting process.

Wolfram Schmidgen | Department of English

Chapter one, on marriage formation, focuses on the principles of the then-emerging theory of contract development. Collectively, these chapters chart the entire trajectory of marriage, from start to finish. Parents: This work has no parents.


  • 4E Cognition and Eighteenth-Century Fiction: How the Novel Found its Feet - Oxford Scholarship.
  • Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property - PDF Free Download.
  • Get this edition.
  • Dreamers and Deceivers: True Stories of the Heroes and Villains Who Made America!
  • Log in to Wiley Online Library?
  • Tweet Share. Master's Papers Deposit your masters paper, project or other capstone work.


    1. Authoring A Discipline: Scholarly Journals and the Post-world War Ii Emergence of Rhetoric and Composition.
    2. Karl Jaspers Philosophy and Psychopathology.
    3. Eighteenth-Century Fan Fiction and Copyright Law.
    4. Once Upon a Pregnancy (Mills & Boon Cherish) (The Wilder Family, Book 4).

    Scholarly Articles and Book Chapters Deposit a peer-reviewed article or book chapter. Undergraduate Honors Theses Deposit your senior honors thesis. Scholarly Journals, Newsletter or Book Deposit a complete issue of a scholarly journal, newsletter or book.

    The 18th Century

    Datasets Deposit your dataset. Datasets may be associated with an article or deposited separately.

    Simon Stern

    The origins of this striking appreciation of mixture can be found in the political and scientific revolutions of the seventeenth century. By retrieving early modern arguments for the civilizing effects of mixture, Schmidgen helps us confront the political and ethical limits of our current fascination with the idea of hybridity.

    Professor Schmidgen is working on an intellectual history of literary innovation in early eighteenth-century culture. This history seeks to situate the emergence of the novel—for literary historians still the dominant symptom of innovation in the period—in a broader narrative about literary change in an anti-essentialist age. The culture of late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century Britain is rarely credited with tolerance of diversity; this period saw a rising pride in national identity, the expansion of colonialism, and glorification of the Anglo-Saxon roots of the country.

    SearchWorks Catalog

    Yet at the same time, Wolfram Schmidgen observes, the concept of mixture became a critical element of Britons' belief in their own superiority. While the scientific, political, and religious establishment of the early s could not imagine that anything truly formed, virtuous, or durable could be produced by mixing unlike kinds or merging absolute forms, intellectuals at the end of the century asserted that mixture could produce superior languages, new species, flawless ideas, and resilient civil societies.

    In Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property, Wolfram Schmidgen draws on legal and economic writings to analyze the description of houses, landscapes, and commodities in eighteenth-century fiction.

    Karin Kukkonen

    His study argues that such descriptions are important to the British imagination of community. By making visible what it means to own something, they illuminate how competing concepts of property define the boundaries of the individual, of social community, and of political systems. In this way, Schmidgen recovers description as a major feature of eighteenth-century prose, and he makes his case across a wide range of authors, including Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, William Blackstone, Adam Smith, and Ann Radcliffe.

    Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property
    Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property
    Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property
    Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property
    Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property
    Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property

Related Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved